October 6, 2011

Question of the Day…

"Are Space Monsters imaginary creatures?" my son asks this morning, waking me at the usual 6a.m. Hmm... That's kind of an interesting one. You see, if you believe that a Universe as big as ours has probably spawned life on planets other than just Earth, then there are Space Creatures out there, somewhere, and no doubt by my son's criteria, they are indeed monsters. So, maybe the answer is no, Space Monsters are not imaginary, they're real.

But that kind of opens a whole can of worms, so to speak, that might be best avoided. And this entire line of logical reasoning calls into question other assumptions, such as, are dragons real? I mean, if you're going with the infinite-combinations-in-infinite-diversity argument, there just might be a dragon (or effectively the same thing) living on some planet out there, somewhere. Hmm. Maybe the best answer right now is to just close my eyes and go back to sleep... :)

Andy Lewicky

ANDY LEWICKY is a Los Angeles-based writer and photographer who enjoys good books, jasmine tea, long walks in the rain, and climbing and skiing the big peaks of the California Sierra. email | follow



  1. Joseph says:

    The question is then begged, can a finite mind grasp infinity? If we are therefore limited and interact on a limited nature and perceive and judge empirically matter which is also finite and limited, is the universe unlimited. I would argue that it is not. I actually believe the principle of infinite combination’s is a fallacy. Therefore we are reduced to probabilities. The problem here lies in the fact that conditions for life to spawn are rather precise (seemingly improbably precise). However probability poses that in such a vast universe with precise conditions are required and the probability is existent but not necessarily guaranteed. However here is where the scientific paradigm breaks down: we rely on empirical evidences to rove our sciences, however for scientific inference to be sound, then the observations which we can only make in our limited slice of the universe must be true in the remotest nebulae, otherwise the reasoning of the above begin to break down. It’s odd how the validity of the concrete scientific method is contingent on abstract philosophical premise. Maybe you should go back to bed. :P

  2. Dan Conger says:

    I’ll just say, yes. I think they exist. The idea that all those quadrillions of stars out there with even more planets are all lifeless balls of rock or gas for light year after light year is preposterous to me. The bigger question is, do they visit us?

  3. Patrick says:

    Similar to what Joseph wrote: Although it may seem likely for life to exist on other planets, it would be a non sequitur to assume that it does exist on other planets. That is, it would be a small sample fallacy; we cannot conclude that life exists on other planets because we only know of one planet that contains viable life. Until this changes, it is illogical to assume that space monsters exist.

    Sea monsters, on the other hand…

  4. Joseph says:

    Holy Cow Patrick, Sea monsters?
    …. You just blew my mind…

  5. Andy says:

    my answer: they don’t exist until they eat you… :)

  6. Joseph says:

    out of mouth and out of sight, then surely out of mind

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